Tag Archives: Edvard Grieg

June 2019 – upcoming London classical gigs – Echo Ensemble’s Love Classical contribution (4th) and ‘The Ancient Tomorrow’ (27th); ‘Mixture: New Music For Organ and Electronics’ at Union Chapel (10th); Marsyas Trio’s ‘Trios For Our Time’ (12th, with workshop on the 2nd)

29 May

Two June concerts from the Echo Ensemble chamber orchestra showcase new works by their director and conductor Noah Max. Barely twenty, Noah’s already a frighteningly accomplished artistic polymath – a conductor, cellist, chorister, New Music advocate and musical entrepreneur who’s also nurturing successful side careers as a painter, poet and filmmaker. As a composer, he’s already lined up a stack of diverse works, performed not only by Echo but by the Ebor Singers, the Marryat Players, the Barbican Piano Trio and Duo d’Oro. (All this, and still no website…) As for the ensemble, they’re a mere couple of years old, but are already making significant ripples in the British classical community and being hailed for their power and imaginative focus.

Echo Ensemble @ 'Love Classical', 4th June 2019

The first of the two concerts is part of the Albert Hall’s ‘Love Classical’ season, tucked away in the Elgar Room: it also features Mozart’s ‘Symphony No. 29’ and Taneyev’s ‘Piano Quintet in G minor, Op. 30’. The Max piece is the world premiere of his complete suite ‘Immolation Dances’ which, as he recalls, “began life a year ago as a ballet which wound together tales such as Icarus and the myth of the Phoenix. The writing process has burned away all but the fiery core of the piece, a white-hot suite of warped dances which explore my fascination with heat and light, resonance, pain and healing. Although its narrative has become more abstract, I hope the piece remains a blazing, emotionally charged inferno, all the more intense for its brevity.”

Echo Ensemble: 'The Ancient Tomorrow', 27th June 2019

The second – ‘The Ancient Tomorrow’, at St Gabriels Pimlico – presents “a programme spanning from Edvard Grieg’s vision of 1600s Norway to the world premiere of a major new work for string orchestra… via neglected French composer André Jolivet’s neoclassical firecracker of a flute concerto.” The Grieg work is ‘Aus Holbergs Zeit’; the Jolivet is his “spontaneous and symmetrical” 1949 ‘Concerto for Flute and Strings’ which they’ll be playing with guest flautist Frederico Paixão (interesting, too, to note the polymathic interests Jolivet and Max share). The new string orchestra piece (another world premiere) is the Max one, ‘The Chakras’, for which information is thin on the ground: check later for the Echo Ensemble’s Facebook page, which seems to be Noah’s main outlet for comments and updates.

A couple of Noah Max’s previous orchestral pieces are on show below…



 
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Marsyas Trio (featuring flautist Helen Vidovich, cellist Val Welbanks and, since late 2017, pianist Olga Stezhko) continue their mission to encourage and perform new repertoire with a concert at the 1901 Club entirely dedicated to premieres, courtesy of various members of the London Composers’ Forum.

Marsyas Trio: 'Trios For Our TImes', 12th June 2019

On the programme are Peter Openshaw ‘Caput redivivum’; ‘Drift’ (by former Fin De Siecle frontwoman and current soundtrack composer Isa Suarez); Illumination Chamber Choir leader Miriam Mackie‘s ‘Same Place’; Alan Taylor‘s ‘Muted & Changing Voices’; Michael Regan‘s ‘In The Shadows’, Alan Hilton‘s ‘Trio’ and Elizabeth Sharma‘s ‘Songs Of The Night’. I’ve not been able to find much in the way of summaries for any of these, but you might be able to find out a little more if you wangled your way into the pre-concert LCF workshop at Goldsmith’s on 2nd June (free to students and LCF members).

In addition, below are some previous examples of work from most of the composers involved, including what sounds like a synthesized demo of the Hilton piece (plus a little of the Marsyas Trio in action a few years ago, with soprano Jessica Summers at the much-missed Forge in Camden).


 
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'Mixture: New Music For Organ and Electronics', 10th June 2019On the subject of Goldsmiths, several of their postgraduate music students (alongside others from Guildhall School of Music & Drama and from the University of Cambridge) will be debuting compositions at a Union Chapel concert on the 10th.

‘Mixture: New Music For Organ and Electronics’ is the capstone concert in a six-month series in which current compositional and performance technology is being brought into play with the chapel’s reknowned Henry Willis pipe organ. For such a grand undertaking, this is a surprisingly undersung event (which I’m going to latch onto as my excuse for not having followed the whole series). The Goldsmiths contingent are Robert Murray Jamieson, Maeve Moayedi, Elisabeth Salverda, Rachel Gibson and Elizabeth Hill-Laurence: that leaves one place apiece for Cambridge and Guildhall, but it’s not clear who those last two composers are. Still, at a ticket price of only £3.50, it’s probably worth dropping by on spec just to find out.

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Dates:

London Composers’ Forum Workshop with Marsyas Trio for ‘Trios For Our Time’
Room 163, Richard Hoggart Building @ Goldsmiths (University of London), Lewisham Way, New Cross, London, SE14 6NW, England
Sunday 2nd June 2019, 12.30pm and 4.30pm
– information here and here

Echo Ensemble @ Love Classical
Elgar Room @ Royal Albert Hall, Kensington Gore, Knightsbridge, London, SW7 2AP, England
Tuesday 4th June 2019, 7.30pm
– information here and here

‘Mixture: New Music For Organ and Electronics’
Union Chapel, 19b Compton Terrace, Islington, London, N1 2UN, England
Monday 10th June 2019, 7.30pm
– information here, here and here

London Composers Forum presents:
Marsyas Trio: ‘Trios For Our Time’
1901 Club, 7 Exton Street, Waterloo, London, SE1 8UE, England
Wednesday 12th June 2019, 6.30pm
– information here and here

Echo Ensemble: ‘The Ancient Tomorrow’
St Gabriel’s Pimlico, Warwick Square, Pimlico, London, SW1V 2AD, England
Thursday 27th June 2019, 8.00pm
– information here and here
 

March 2017 – upcoming London classical/classical-experimental gigs, (7th, 16th, 17th) – Kammer Klang (with Klara Lewis/Nik Colk Void, Christopher Redgate, Phaedra Ensemble performing Leo Chadburn and John Uren); Tomos Xerri & Claire Wickes’ rush-hour duets (with a new Liam Mattison piece); Elisabeth Turmo & Elena Toponogova’s Norwegian/Russian celebration

1 Mar

As well as composers ranging from Grieg to Takemitsu, these three upcoming London gigs take in trolls, moths, David Bowie, extended fiddles and oboes, and just a tiny hint of saw abuse. Let’s have a look and listen.

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Kammer Klang, 7th March 2017Kammer Klang presents:
Klara Lewis + Phaedra Ensemble (performing Leo Chadburn) + Christopher Redgate + John Uren + Holodisc DJs
Café Oto, 18-22 Ashwin Street, Dalston, London, E8 3DL, England
Tuesday 7th March 2017, 7.30pm
– information here and here

From the Kammerers (supplemented by a few text raids from here and there)…

“In our second show of 2017 we are joined by Klara Lewis, the critically acclaimed sound sculptress who has performed in clubs and art galleries around the world. Lewis builds her work from heavily manipulated samples and field recordings, creating a unique combination of the organic and the digital. Klara’s second album ‘Too’ was released in 2016 on Editions Mego to great acclaim. She will be performing with Nik Colk Void, an experimental electronic recording artist who is one part of Factory Floor (an alliance with Gabriel Gurnsey) and one-third of Carter Tutti Void (with former Throbbing Gristle members Cosey Fanny Tutti and Chris Carter). Coming from an English art school background, and an education that was decidedly non-musical in nature, Nik’s work is as conceptual as it is visceral – exploring the out-regions of pushing and manipulating sound (via modular synthesis, extended guitar techniques and vocal processing), and collaborating with contemporary visual artists such as Haroon Mirza and Philippe Parreno.



 
“We are also joined by Phaedra Ensemble, whose performances explore the spaces between classical, experimental and contemporary music. Phaedra brings together some of London’s most exciting musicians to curate programmes with new collaborations, reinterpretations of well-known modern works and forgotten classics. Its members have a strong intuition for genre-crossing and interdisciplinary work, often in collaboration with artists from other disciplines. This month Phaedra will perform ‘The Indistinguishables’, a 2014 string-quartet-and-electronics work by Leo Chadburn. Leo is a composer and performer of experimental and electronic music, gallery music and (as Simon Bookish) avant-pop. ‘The Indistinguishables’ works through a cycle of seventy names of UK moth species, each accompanied by a chord or phrase, like a fleeting soundtrack to these evocative words. The recordings are triggered by the quartet, so the pacing of the pauses and resonances is under their control, part of their ensemble dynamic.


 
“Phaedra will also be performing this month’s “Fresh Klang” work, which is from British composer John Uren. ‘A few weeks after David Bowie’s death in January 2016, Dr Mark Taubert, a palliative care doctor based in Cardiff, wrote an open letter to Bowie, posthumously thanking him for the soundtrack he had provided to his life, his dedication to his art, and the inspiration he was, and continues to be, for others also facing end-of-life illnesses. Retweeted by Bowie’s son, Duncan Jones, Mark’s letter has gone on to have a huge impact, and has been recited at several Letters Live events by Jarvis Cocker and Benedict Cumberbatch. John collaborated with Mark for this composition, combining a recording of Mark reading his own beautiful letter with fragile strings and electronic timbres; acting as a cushion for Mark’s words to drift across.


 
“The distinguished oboeist Christopher Redgate will perform his own work ‘Multiphonia’. Since his time as a student at the Royal Academy of Music, he has specialised in the performance of contemporary oboe music. Now the Evelyn Barbirolli Research Fellow at the Royal Academy of Music and a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Music, Christopher (in collaboration with Howarth of London) has redesigned the instrument. He performs exclusively on his creation, the Howarth-Redgate 21st Century Oboe, which offers extended capability for twenty-first-century music including microtones, multiphonics, extended range and electronics.

“There will also be DJ sets from the people behind British experimental music label Holodisc.”

Programme:

Fresh Klang: John Uren – Her Own Dying Moments (performed by Phaedra Ensemble)
Leo Chadburn – The Indistinguishables (performed by Phaedra Ensemble)
Christopher Redgate – Multiphonia (for solo oboe)
Klara Lewis + Nik Colk Void – improvised set

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South and slightly west, here are a couple of interesting-looking duo shows at the 1901 Club in Waterloo – picked out from the rest of the venue’s busy schedule by dint of having interesting instrumentation, interesting juxtapositions, or the promise of new pieces being premiered.

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Tomos Xerri, 2017Hattori Foundation presents:
Hattori Foundation Rush-Hour Recital: Tomos Xerri & Claire Wickes
1901 Club, 7 Exton Street, Waterloo, London, SE1 8UE, England
Thursday 16th March 2017, 6.00pm
information

Outstanding contemporary harpist and Riot Ensemble member Tomos Xerri performs regular duet concerts with English National Opera’s principal flautist Claire Wickes (who also plays as guest principal with most of the big London orchestras, as well as the São Paulo Symphony). Here’s one of those shows – one of the Hattori Foundation’s showcase concerts, nicely timed for the Waterloo homeward-bounders.

Claire Wickes, 2017

While Claire and Tomos will be playing a set of established pieces by Takemitsu, Debussy, Piazzolla and American tonal hero Lowell Liebermann (as well as a sonata by the distinguished twentieth-century British polymath William Alwyn), they are both strong enthusiasts for contemporary music, and are premiering a new composition by Trinity Laban alumnus Liam Mattison (a recent partipant in the LSO’s Panufnik Composers Scheme).

Look out, too, for any mention of Tomas’ upcoming musical-saw-and-electronics project… which at the moment seems to be more of a tingling promise than anything concrete. If any more evidence shows up, I’ll blog it myself.

Programme:

Astor Piazzolla – Bordel 1900 (from Histoire du Tango)
Lowell Liebermann – Sonata for Flute & Harp
Claude Debussy – La Chevelure (from Trois Chansons de Bilitis), Nuit D’Étoiles
Tōru Takemitsu – Toward the Sea III
Liam Mattison – new commission
William Alwyn – Naiades (Fantasy-Sonata)

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Elisabeth Turmo, 20171901 Club presents:
Elisabeth Turmo & Elena Toponogova: “Two Journeys”
1901 Club, 7 Exton Street, Waterloo, London, SE1 8UE, England
Friday 17th March 2017, 6.30pm
information

This is a musical celebration of two cultures, Norwegian and Russian, performed by Norwegian violinist Elisabeth Turmo and Siberian pianist Elena Toponogova. Both are recent or imminent Masters graduates from the Royal College of Music, with growing international reputations. Elizabeth has performed as a soloist with the Arctic Philharmonic, the Oslo Chamber Orchestra, the Toppen International Festival Orchestra and the Barratt Due Symphony Orchestra; while Elena has performed as a chamber musician and soloist across the United Kingdom, Russia and Germany.

Elena Tonogova, 2017Already tagged as “conveying the stormful temperament of a northern Norwegian” in her concert performances, Elisabeth is also an up-and-coming exponent of the hardingfele, or “Hardanger fiddle” – the thin-wooded Norwegian violin with additional sympathetic strings which is traditionally used for folk dances and church processionals, and which bridges the gap between Norway’s ecclesiastical life and its supernatural mythology (by way of “troll-tunings” and Robert Johnson-esque myths about music lessons from the Devil).

Several hardingfele pieces will be performed as part of the concert set. I doubt that these will include a solo arrangement of Michael Grolid’s recent ‘Ouverture’ (as played here two years ago by Elizabeth and Barratt Due’s Symphony Orchestra) but I’ve included it in lieu of her having posted up any other recordings with the instrument.


 
Programme:

Ole Bull – A Mountain Vision
Selected pieces for hardingfele
Bjarne Brustad – Fairy-tail for violin (solo)
Edvard Grieg – Solveig’s Song (from the ‘Peer Gynt’ suite)
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – Melody for violin and piano Op.42 No.3
Nikolai Medtner – Sonata Reminiscenza Op.38 (from ‘Forgotten Melodies’
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – (arr. Mikhail Pletnev ) – Intermezzo (from ‘The Nutcracker Suite’)
Igor Frolov (from George Gershwin) – Concert Fantasy on Themes from ‘Porgy and Bess’
 

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